NP diploma mills? Are we diluting the profession?

What about 100% online NP programs? How about accelerated or direct-entry NP programs?

This is a response to the following article: Independent practice: Both nurse practitioners and physicians should be outraged

While I’m not supporting or denouncing the article, I do question its motives and stance. I get the feeling it was a bit one-sided. None the less, I felt the article raises a number of sensitive and important areas of concern. Many of them have been submitted as #heysean questions. Here are just some of the talking points:

  • ill-prepared NPs
  • 100% acceptance rate
  • 0 hours working as an RN
  • non-nurse direct entry programs
  • clinical hours: the honor system
  • similar outcomes NP vs. physician

 

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If you enjoy my work and want to support me creating new and exciting content, I’m on Patreon! With your help, I can expand and create even cooler stuff. Check me out and donate: https://www.patreon.com/seanpdent
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The views and opinions expressed on this website and/or in the videos on this channel are that of myself and not of any educational institution. In compliance with HIPAA and to ensure patient privacy, all patient identifiers in all content have been deleted and/or altered. The views expressed on this website and/or in the videos on this channel are personal opinions only, not intended as medical advice. The information I present is for general knowledge purposes only.

 

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When did you know the ICU was for you?

I still remember THE moment I knew I wanted to be a critical care nurse. Yes, I broke the mold. I eventually was a new grad nurse in the ICU.

Almost 15 years and two degrees later I’m now an Acute Care Nurse Practitioner still working in the ICU.

Yep. You could say I love it.


**IMPORTANT NOTICE** This was a recording from my Instagram account, so it’s not the highest quality (wonky formatting). Some of the video content and conversation is out of context, but I thought the information was valuable and wanted to share it here. I hope you don’t mind.

 

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If you enjoy my work and want to support me creating new and exciting content, I’m on Patreon! With your help, I can expand and create even cooler stuff. Check me out and donate: https://www.patreon.com/seanpdent
____________________________________________________
**Follow me on Instagram: @seanpdent
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**Have a question? http://bit.ly/askheysean
**Buy me a coffee? http://bit.ly/seanscoffee
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The views and opinions expressed on this website and/or in the videos on this channel are that of myself and not of any educational institution. In compliance with HIPAA and to ensure patient privacy, all patient identifiers in all content have been deleted and/or altered. The views expressed on this website and/or in the videos on this channel are personal opinions only, not intended as medical advice. The information I present is for general knowledge purposes only.

 

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Find all of my recommended products and the gear I used in my videos at www.amazon.com/shop/seanpdent

The ONE thing every nurse knows about a good shift

The perfect shift. Everyone wants it, but few have ever experienced it. I mean sure, we have gotten close to it many times, but I don’t think any of us have had the perfect shift.
What is the perfect shift? That shift that just fits perfectly. Here is a short list of things that need to happen during a ‘perfect’ shift:

• Clock in on time
• An assignment that has all the makings to be awesome
⁃ Not easy, but not so busy that you never sit down
⁃ A patient that is appreciative and compliant
⁃ No evidence of crazy anywhere surrounding the patient
⁃ Bodily fluids are functioning fairly normal and predictive
• You work with your ‘people’
⁃ This means at least one nurse BFF
⁃ Engaging and collaborative providers
⁃ Assistants who are on top of things
⁃ Other staff members are fun and hard working
• Nursing leadership is hands-on and receptive
⁃ This includes a charge nurse who pitches in
• You’re CHARTING is not only on point but gets done on-time or dare-I-say early
• You clock out on time

 

This next-to-last item is THE fulcrum of your perfect shift, hell, to EVERY shift… ever. Period. Let’s get serious here, think about it for a hot minute. Every day becomes infinitely worse when your charting is not up to date and SURELY makes for a crappy day when you realize your charting is not going to be done before shift change or report.

It downright sucks.

Charting is the ONE thing that makes or breaks your shift. Sure, sure, sure, we could talk ad nauseam about all the bazillion things that can make a shift ‘bad.’ Basically, everything in the list above is either not present, or is just the opposite. #AMIRITE

The thing about your shifts… is that a good shift flies by! While a bad shift sucks the life outta ya. I mean a shift gets infinitely more difficult because you have made up in your mind it’s a bad shift. I don’t know how many times I’ve worsened my day by drowning in my sorrows and harping on how ‘bad’ a shift I’m having.

[Tweet “Charting will never be done. It’s a fact.”]

It’s safe to say that I wasted A LOT of energy during the first five-ish years of my career making things worse for myself. My shifts always seemed to be bad for that one reason I mentioned earlier. That one item on the list that is the fulcrum of the perfect shift. If my charting wasn’t done, and not done on time… I would say to myself (and out loud), “I’m having such a horrible shift.” I felt so out of control. I would continuously victimize myself just because my charting took forever most days.
I’ll admit, in the early years, my charting was SO slowww. I mean super slow. A turtle and a snail moved faster than my charting. My efficiency was for crap. And I always used to beat myself up about it.

It was a problem… until it wasn’t a problem.

Until the moment I realized that my charting was always going to be tough, that no matter how hard I tried… the timeliness of my charting was mostly out of my control. I chose to care for my patients at the bedside instead of charting quite often (and still do). I developed the mindset of, “The charting will get done, eventually.”

It was quite a liberating moment.

All of a sudden, I had fewer and fewer ‘bad’ shifts. And I became a much happier nurse. It was mind-boggling how much better I felt, and how my stress almost disappeared.

I laugh about it now, but back then it was one of those moments when you say to yourself, “WTH! Why didn’t anyone tell me about this?”

Charting will never be done. It’s a fact.

Your charting will suck for a long time. It only gets better with time in grade. Experience is the ONLY way you get better and get more efficient. Be patient.
Accept it for what it is and move on. You will spend a lot of shifts staying after report to finish charting, welcome to nursing.

I promise you this lil’ secret is no secret at all. It’s something every nurse learns the hard way. It’s not only a skill we all have to develop, but it’s also a mindset we all have to embrace.

 


 

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If you enjoy my work and want to support me creating new and exciting content, I’m on Patreon! With your help, I can expand and create even cooler stuff. Check me out and donate: https://www.patreon.com/seanpdent
____________________________________________________
**Follow me on Instagram: @seanpdent
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**Let’s continue the conversation: http://bitly.com/thenursetribe
**Have a question? http://bit.ly/askheysean
**Buy me a coffee? http://bit.ly/seanscoffee
____________________________________________________
The views and opinions expressed on this website and/or in the videos on this channel are that of myself and not of any educational institution. In compliance with HIPAA and to ensure patient privacy, all patient identifiers in all content have been deleted and/or altered. The views expressed on this website and/or in the videos on this channel are personal opinions only, not intended as medical advice. The information I present is for general knowledge purposes only.
*may contain affiliate links*
Find all of my recommended products and the gear I used in my videos at www.amazon.com/shop/seanpdent

The #1 trait of all successful nurses

What do I consider to be the most important personality trait of a nurse? Caring? Compassionate? There are SO many things a nurse should be, but if I had to pick one trait that trumps them all. The ONE trait that will almost always guarantee success…

GRIT

Passion and perseverance over a long period of time. Sticking to your goal regardless of how it goes (day in and day out).

Dealing with the CRAP we face every single day without losing your “why”… why you decided to become a nurse.

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Having a strong “bounce-back”.

Advocating for a human being is hard damn work. Check out my answer below:

**IMPORTANT NOTICE** This was a recording from my Instagram account, so it’s not the highest quality (wonky formatting). Some of the video content and conversation is out of context, but I thought the information was valuable and wanted to share it here. I hope you don’t mind.

 

 

Oh, and I have to give credit where credit is due –> Angel Lee Duckworth


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If you enjoy my work and want to support me creating new and exciting content, I’m on Patreon! With your help, I can expand and create even cooler stuff. Check me out and donate: https://www.patreon.com/seanpdent
____________________________________________________
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**Let’s continue the conversation: bitly.com/thenursetribe
**Have a question? https://heysean.info/
**Buy me a coffee? http://bit.ly/seanscoffee
____________________________________________________
The views and opinions expressed on this website and/or in the videos on this channel are that of myself and not of any educational institution. In compliance with HIPAA and to ensure patient privacy, all patient identifiers in all content have been deleted and/or altered. The views expressed on this website and/or in the videos on this channel are personal opinions only, not intended as medical advice. The information I present is for general knowledge purposes only.
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The #1 piece of advice for ADN nursing students?

I started my nursing career journey as a diploma graduate, which is quite similar to the ADN = Associate’s Degree Nurse. Both are approximately two years (or less) of didactic learning where you acquire the number of required clinical hours to sit for the NCLEX-RN exam. Upon completion of the ADN program, you will have your Associate’s in Science in Nursing. Whereas the diploma program is just that, you graduate with a diploma (this is usually a hospital-based nursing program). Yours truly started in an 18-month accelerated diploma program many moons ago.

A great question from the tribe. I answer this question, not only for all ADN students, but my piece of advice is applicable to ALL nursing students. Watch the video below:

 

 

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DON’T FORGET TO SIGN UP FOR EMAIL UPDATES –> HERE!
If you enjoy my work and want to support me creating new and exciting content, I’m on Patreon! With your help, I can expand and create even cooler stuff. Check me out and donate: https://www.patreon.com/seanpdent
____________________________________________________
**Follow me on Instagram: @seanpdent
**Facebook Live every week: http://bit.ly/2hd3M8X
**Let’s continue the conversation: bitly.com/thenursetribe
**Have a question? https://heysean.info/
**Buy me a coffee? http://bit.ly/seanscoffee
____________________________________________________
The views and opinions expressed on this website and/or in the videos on this channel are that of myself and not of any educational institution. In compliance with HIPAA and to ensure patient privacy, all patient identifiers in all content have been deleted and/or altered. The views expressed on this website and/or in the videos on this channel are personal opinions only, not intended as medical advice. The information I present is for general knowledge purposes only.
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